What a Ride it has Been

9 months ago, I was finishing up all my paperwork and touching up my resume in order to become a university physician of my Alma mater; now, I am finishing up my clinic duty for the day and I would be done with my contract.

I have mentioned many times in my past posts that I was given the opportunity to become the director of the university health services, a full time faculty in several schools of medicine, and a post in the research department, but I had to decline most, if not all, of these since I have a greater goal – that is to start training real soon, or soon enough.

My goal is to train in the States so I need to prepare for yet another medical licensure examintion, the USMLE, which is divided into 4 exams; these are not just any exam that I can take them on a whim, I really need to prepare for these. I will be linking a future post on how I reached my decision in going back home in the States and hoping to train there.

As flattered I am by the university and my colleagues in the university clinic wanting me to stay, I am much more elated that they understand my goals and would not hinder my wanting to train as soon as possible.

I am the youngest in the clinic, and at the time I was hired here, I was only 3 months being officially licensed as a physcian. So, I felt that my confidence level is still low to lead a team or to be taken seriously. Thankfully, my fears are put to rest as the team trusted me since day 1, guiding me in things I am not to sure of, and more importantly, accepting me and making me part of their close knit family. The latter is the one I appreciate the most. I learned a lot and I had a lot of great memories… But it is being part of this family that will be the best part of this job.

Even if I am just a general physician here in the university, I do have my share of toxity (our term for a hectic workday along with difficult cases and whatnot); that is something quite rare in an out patient department setting like here in the clinic. I’ve seen cases like diabetic ketoacidosis in a 15 year old, Takotsubo syndrome, retinal detachment, etc. Now some of these cases are common in the hospital setting, but to be primarily diagnosed in a clinic like here, and with what little I can request in terms of ancillary procedures to confirm my assumptions, it is quite a feat for a young physician as myself. This helped me become a little more confident as a diagnostician.

And through it all, my colleagues never doubted me.

That really helps a fledging physician.

Such as what my collague and my mentor said yesterday during our pizza pig out, “I hate goodbyes…”, but honestly, this is not goodbye, more of a “see you all later”, even if I do become a licensed physician in the States and I train there, these colleagues of mine are now family and I have no doubt that in the future when we see each other somewhere down whatever road, we can easily get a cup of coffee or two, reminisce our days in the clinic, and just smile on how far we all eventually come.

With that, in a few hours time, Christian Udarbe, M.D., University Physician, would have signed out. And what a ride it has been!

03-29-2017 Thank You UHS-1.jpg

Til next time! PEACE!

Addendum:

This is Dr. Udarbe, university physician, officially signing off.

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Lecture, lecture, LECTURE!

Reporting is an integral requirement in junior internship, so I am not surprised having a report, or two, every week to our residents or consultants. But to be tasked to lecture to nurses, nursing students, and other students in similar medical fields, comes to me as surprise.
Being a medical student, albeit, A STUDENT, makes this quite the endeavor indeed. I am both excited and dreaded at the thought that I will lecture these people from the different medical fields when, I myself, am a student and also learning as much as they are.
My topic, thankfully, is a somewhat easy topic, that being Measles. I have made my PowerPoint presentation weeks ago, but now at the every eve of my lecture, I am forgetting what I have read. Typical.
But hey, I have been on a roll lately with my previous reports garnering great praises from my residents and consultants, so hopefully I will continue this run up until I graduate.
Here are further requirements needed for my lecture: A tarpaulin and flyers. I made them simplified mini lectures as compared to my more in-depth PowerPoint, because I have a feeling that where ever and for how long the hospital decides to have these, most likely it will also be read by patients themselves, thus, those will a much lower knowledge of medicine in general.
Here are the gist of my lecture by way of a simplified tarpaulin and flyer designs:
AUFMC PFCM Measles Flyers Page 1
First page of my flyer
AUFMC PFCM Measles Flyers Page 2
Second page of my flyer
AUFMC PFCM Measles Tarp
The Tarpaulin

So yeah, my PowerPoint will be more in-depth, and less… non-medical friendly, in the sense that one should have a background in any of the medical fields to have an idea what I am saying. Thankfully, I am lecturing within the hospital.
So yes, wish me LUCK! And PRAYERS are appreciated!
PEACE!